#WhatIReallyReallyWant - Girl Power

Sisterhood - Spice world forever 
Since my adolescence, I had an affiliation with a loud mouth, and was loud, had the qualities associated with men. In Vietnam, women weren't supposed to be like that in public (especially since I am coming from a super traditional family). Little girls were taught to be sugar and spice and everything nice. “Be quiet and polite,” we were told “Acquiesce, and don’t take up too much space.” The media promoted, explained their value and importance and would relate to their relationships, especially with boyfriends, on how pretty they looked.

When Spice Girls came out, eventhough I didnt understand English, but saw them on Live tv Kicking and getting completely arseholed, seemed funny and brilliant. That ladette culture they were part of helped me to accept the way I was that I prefer to be like Scary spice ( crazy with my not so pale skin) and Sporty ( eventhough I hate PE lessons). It was my way into thinking about being a different type of girl, in terms of opportunities and standards. In Vietnam we didn’t have young pop stars like that at the time – the stars were middle-aged men or young girl which were super girly and made themselves look as pale as possible, the anime girl look. All the songs were about being in love. While I was living at the time in a rough, domestic violent family, at the age of 10. I made up my mind to not believe in any of the cheesy love song lyrics.

When the Spice Girls came out, it was just so powerful, happy and diverse. Each and every one of them was different. They were all mates, it made me believe in that I will find my own sisterhood one day; despite being bullied and singled out at school everyday. 
Over 2 decades on, I left my childhood behind, I started to grow up in a different way. I understand that friendship has to come to an end just like any relationship but good people, rarely walk out of your life. It was very special to be brought back to childhood again with my sister Roma and to feel 2 and believe in viva forever for that moment.

Thanks Roma for treating me, I love you sister.

#WhatIReallyReallyWant - Girl Power


Since my adolescence, I had an affiliation with a loud mouth, and was loud, had the qualities associated with men. In Vietnam, women weren't supposed to be like that in public (especially since I am coming from a super traditional family). Little girls were taught to be sugar and spice and everything nice. “Be quiet and polite,” we were told “Acquiesce, and don’t take up too much space.” The media promoted, explained their value and importance and would relate to their relationships, especially with boyfriends, on how pretty they looked.

When Spice Girls came out, eventhough I didn’t understand English, but saw them on Live tv Kicking and getting completely arseholed, seemed funny and brilliant. That ladette culture they were part of helped me to accept the way I was that I prefer to be like Scary spice ( crazy with my not so pale skin) and Sporty ( eventhough I hate PE lessons). It's not such a radical idea now, but to a 90s kid like me who raised on pretty princesses and clever tomboys, discovering you could be both at once was a revelation.

It was my way into thinking about being a different type of girl, in terms of opportunities and standards. In Vietnam, we didn’t have young pop stars like that at the time – the stars were middle-aged men or young girl which were super girly and made themselves look as pale as possible, the anime girl look. All the songs were about being in love. While I was living at the time in a rough, domestic violent family, at the age of 10. I made up my mind to not believe in any of the cheesy love song lyrics.

When the Spice World appeared, it was just so powerful, happy and diverse. Each one of them was different. They were all mates, it made me believe in that I will find my own sisterhood one day; despite being bullied and singled out at school everyday. 

Among the gleeful nonsense lyrics (whatever "zig-a-zig-ah" meant, I knew it was probably rude), those songs were full of empowering sound bites. Chicas to the front! Stop right now! I'll tell you what I really, really want. While other pop stars pined over break-ups and unrequited love, songs like 'Wannabe' and 'Too Much' were cheerfully non-committal. "If you really bug me, then I'll say goodbye." Spice Girl style might have been cartoonish and often sexy as hell, but it also gave us options. They taught us that a 'proper' girl could still wear a tracksuit and backflip down a banqueting table - but likewise, turbo-charged femininity wasn't incompatible with power either. In the Spice philosophy, everyone had the right to be taken seriously.


Over 2 decades on, I left my childhood behind, I started to grow up in a different way. I understand that friendship has to come to an end just like any relationship but good people, rarely walk out of your life. It was very special to be brought back to childhood again with my sister Roma and to feel 2 and believe in viva forever for that moment.

Thanks, Roma ( my first client and no longer an on going client ) for treating me. She is now part of my family. I love you sister and super grateful for my job everyday.